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Published Research

2011

Jacobson, R. P., Jacobson, K. J. L., & Hood, J. N. (2011). Using Social Norms Theory to Reduce Workplace Bullying. Proceedings of the International Academy of Business and Public Administration Disciplines. Honolulu, HI.

Jacobson, R. P., Mortensen, C. R., & Cialdini, R. B. (2011). Bodies obliged and unbound: Differentiated response tendencies for injunctive and descriptive social norms. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 433-448.

2012

Hood, J. N., Jacobson, K. J. L., & Jacobson, R. P. (2012). The impact of organizational values and norms on creating an ethical organizational culture free from bullying behavior. Proceedings of the International Academy of Business and Public Administration Disciplines. Honolulu, Hawaii.

Jacobson, K. J. L., & Jacobson, R. P. (2012). The effects of machismo values on organizational outcomes among Hispanic professionals: A research agenda. D. M. Blancero & R. G. DelCampo (Eds.), Hispanics@Work: A Collection of Research, Theory, and Application, Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science.

2015

Jacobson, R.P., Jacobson, K.J.L., & Hood, J.N.  (in press). Social norm perceptions predict citizenship behaviors. Journal of Managerial Psychology.

Jacobson, R. P., Mortensen, C. R., Jacobson, K. J. L., & Cialdini, R. B. (2015). Self-control moderates the effectiveness of influence attempts highlighting injunctive social norms. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 6(6), 718-726.

Under Review

Cast, M. L., Jacobson, R. P., Jacobson, K. J. L., & DelCampo, R. G. (under review). Machismo in organizations: Individual level predictors and context dependent outcomes. Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal.

Dang, C. T., Jacobson, R. P., & Fong, C. T. (under review). Mixing business with pleasure: The effects of emotional legitimacy on objectification and prosocial behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

Jacobson, R. P., Hood, J. N., & Jacobson, K. J. L. (under review). Moral emotional traits and bullying: Guilt proneness and reparative action tendencies reduce bullying perpetration. Journal of Business Psychology.