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Press Release

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTS TO CELEBRATE THEIR PRESENCE AND ACHIEVEMENTS ON CAMPUS

April 13, 2001

ALBUQUERQUE - Several University of New Mexico Native American student organizations have come together to organize and sponsor the annual Nizhoni Week, April 16-20, with the theme “United Native Movement - A New Beginning in Higher Education.” The annual celebration demonstrates the rich Native American population on campus with food, tribal dancing demonstrations, and academic panel discussions and workshops.

This weeklong event, cosponsored by C.I.R.C.L.E. Society of American Indians, the American Indian Business Association (AIBA), Miss Indian UNM, Pre-Med Association, and the Native American Center for Excellence, will start Monday morning at 7 a.m. on Johnson Field with a sunrise blessing ceremony. A panel discussion on opportunities for Native Americans at UNM will be held in the Woodward Hall, Room 101, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Other events of the week include a report on Native American students at UNM at Career Services from 3 to 4 p.m. on Tuesday; a drum group performance on Zimmerman Plaza at noon on Wednesday followed by a Pueblo Giveaway at 1 p.m. On Thursday, there will be another drum group performance on the Mall at noon along with the introduction of the Miss Indian UNM candidates. Finally, on Friday will be a closing banquet at the UNM Science and Technology Park, 851 University Blvd. SE, honoring Native American freshmen. The banquet will begin at 6:30 p.m.

“There’s power in numbers and when we get together we should have a voice,” said Evalena Boone, business student and Operations Manager for AIBA.

Nizhoni Week 2001 events focus on the current Native American student population and demonstrate how student involvement enhances the University experience. Most events are free and open to the community; reservations for the banquet can be made by calling 277-8447.

Nizhoni Week has been celebrated at UNM since the 1970s. The C.I.R.C.L.E. Society, which used to be known as the KIVA Club, has always sponsored this annual event. The Navajo word “Nizhoni” translates to “beautiful, harmony.”

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The Anderson School of Management at the University of New Mexico is dedicated to excellence in professional management education. At the Anderson School, faculty, staff, and students are committed to shaping the intellect and character of the next generation of business leaders, advancing the knowledge and practice of management, promoting economic development, and building a vibrant intellectual community that serves the highest and best interests of all our stakeholders.

The School was founded in 1947 and now offers more than a dozen concentrations at the BBA and MBA levels and is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business in the top 20% of business schools in the nation. The School is funded by the State of New Mexico and further support is generated by The Anderson School of Management Foundation. For more information, the public can visit www.mgt.unm.edu, email info@mgt.unm.edu, or call (505) 277-6471.

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