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Press Release

ANDERSON SCHOOLS HAVE NO ENROLLMENT DILEMMAS WHEN IT COMES TO WOMEN

May 26, 2000

ALBUQUERQUE - Most MBA programs in the country may be resembling the proverbial "old boys club" - but not The University of New Mexico's Anderson Schools of Management.

A recent Wall Street Journal article stated that the number of women enrolled in MBA programs around the country has been leveling off. But at UNM, 43% of students in the graduate program are women.

A groundbreaking study sponsored in part by Proctor & Gamble and Ford Motor Company polled more than 1,600 recent MBA graduates and discovered that while the vast majority of women were satisfied with their MBA experience, it appeared that many women did not see the value of pursuing the advanced business degree. These women did not feel that an MBA would afford them the same salaries and opportunities for career advancement that seem guaranteed to their male peers.

So what makes The Anderson Schools an exception to the statistics this study reported? Loyola Chastain, MBA Program Manager, attributes it to the fact that The Schools have a more open admissions policy than other business schools. "Women stand a more even chance of admission [at Anderson] because they may have just as strong a GMAT and GPA as men," she said.

An additional reason women may find their academic home at The Anderson Schools is the availability of support and role models.

"The Schools have a higher number of female faculty to serve as role models than most business schools," said Leslie Oakes, Anderson's Associate Dean. "Over 25 percent of our faculty are women - where the U.S. average is under 10 percent - and they are at the top of their field."

Oakes also cites the benefits of awards like the Jean Mullins Macey scholarships as an asset. These funds have supported the business educations of nearly 100 women since 1983, she said.

"With many MBA courses offered at night, women who juggle work and family have the opportunity to pursue their degrees without having to fit into a traditional student schedule," Oakes said.

The hard work pays off. Recent female MBA graduates have received job offers from local government offices like Sandia National Laboratories and accounting firms like Pulakos & Alongi and Rogoff, Erickson, Diamond & Walker. Others have been offered careers with national and international organizations like Intel Corporation, JD Edwards, Price Waterhouse Coopers and Arthur Andersen, LLP.

For more information about the BBA and MBA programs at The Anderson Schools of Management at The University of New Mexico, contact the Advisement and Placement Center at (505) 277-3888.

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The Anderson School of Management at the University of New Mexico is dedicated to excellence in professional management education. At the Anderson School, faculty, staff, and students are committed to shaping the intellect and character of the next generation of business leaders, advancing the knowledge and practice of management, promoting economic development, and building a vibrant intellectual community that serves the highest and best interests of all our stakeholders.

The School was founded in 1947 and now offers more than a dozen concentrations at the BBA and MBA levels and is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business in the top 20% of business schools in the nation. The School is funded by the State of New Mexico and further support is generated by The Anderson School of Management Foundation. For more information, the public can visit www.mgt.unm.edu, email info@mgt.unm.edu, or call (505) 277-6471.

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